ANCIENT CITIES

ANCIENT CITIES

It is located 4 kilometers east of Altinoluk Town of Edremit District, on the skirts of Kaz (Ida) Mountain, and there are different opinions about its founders. The history of the city, which has a strategic location on the Adramytteion-Asos road, is based on the Trojan War according to ancient writers. The earliest historical find in the city is a juvenile grave dating back to the 8th century BC.



Antandros

It is located 4 kilometers east of Altinoluk Town of Edremit District, on the skirts of Kaz (Ida) Mountain, and there are different opinions about its founders. The history of the city, which has a strategic location on the Adramytteion-Asos road, is based on the Trojan War according to ancient writers. The earliest historical find in the city is a juvenile grave dating back to the 8th century BC.

B.C. Antandros, which was occupied by the Cimmerians in 650 BC, was captured by the Lydian king Kroisos in 570 BC. A fire layer was encountered in the finds of this period and this layer is interpreted as the traces of the war. Afterwards, the city, which preserved its importance in Persian, Pergamon Kingdom and Roman periods, became the Bishopric Center during the Christian period. Famous for its timber production and shipyards throughout history, the city has been the subject of many legends.

The three beauty contests, which are said to have caused the Troia (Trojan) wars, were held in this city. In the beauty contest between Paris, Athena, Hera and Aphrodite, which Zeus commissioned to choose the most beautiful, she declares Aphrodite, who promised her love, first. Following this promise, with the help of Aphrodite, the Trojan War took place as a result of Paris kidnapping Helen. After the Achaeans captured Troy (Troy) as a result of the war, the heroic commander Aeneas from Troy came to Antandros to establish a new city. Commander Aeneas, who set up ships with the help of the people of Antandros, who is famous for the timber trade in the Kaz Mountains, starts his journey from here.

The city is also famous for its necropolis (cemetery). The city necropolis, which has been used as a cemetery for 700 years without interruption, has the feature of a laboratory with all burial customs from direct burial to burial, sarcophagi to roof tile tombs. The excavations of Antandros Ancient City, which is predicted to be the Ephesus of the future by arcology circles, continue today.

 

Adramytteion

The ancient city of Adramyttion, which gives its name to the bay where the Aegean Sea meets the land, is located within the boundaries of the Ören Town of Burhaniye on the land surrounded by Madra Mountain in the west, in the east and Ida (Kaz Mountain) in the north. The city has been described by many ancient authors as one of the important settlements of the Mysia Region. It is also known as the hometown of the city philosopher Diodorus and the famous orator Ksonokles.

The earliest dated find found in Adremyttion dates back to the early Bronze Age (3000 BC). Kent, BC. It was rebuilt by Croesus’s brother Adramys in the 550s (Lydian period), and it is stated that the city was named after Adramys. After the Lydians, the city was conquered by Persians, Alexander the Great Empire, Pergamon Kingdom and Romans. B.C. The coins with the Zeus head and Pegasus protom, dated to the 4th century, are the oldest and most famous coins known to have been minted in the region.

The city has emerged as one of the most important settlements of the region in Antiquity thanks to the rich lands it dominates besides land and sea trade. Since the Roman period, maritime trade has developed in the area up to the Sea of Marmara, next to the Greek mainland, islands and eastern Mediterranean ports. In the Byzantine period, Adremyttion was appointed as the largest jurisdiction of the Asian Province.

The main ruins are the antique period pier, the ruins of the walls, the Temple of Apollo, the Roman period bridge near the Çoruk Village, and the Yılantepe Altar that can still be observed today.

 

Kyzikos

Kyzikos is one of the ancient cities, famous for its harbor, Hdrian temple, wine, olive oil, marble, coins and perfumes, located just north of where Kapıdağ Peninsula joins the land on the Marmara shores. According to mythology, the city was founded by King Kyzikos, a descendant of the Thracian King Eusorsos, and for this reason it was named after him.

Kyzikos Ancient City, which is predicted to have a history of 2,500 years, was built in BC. In 756, it was captured by immigrants from Milet and became a Miletian colony. B.C. Kyzikos, who came under Lydian rule in 546, then passed under the rule of Persia, Macedonia and Romans. B.C. Although Kyzikos experienced the most brilliant period in 362 years, it lost its importance after the division of the Roman Empire into two. MS in Kyzikos, whose history was frequently interrupted by earthquakes. As a result of the earthquake in 543, the Temple of Hadrian and the Kyzikos Amphitheater, which were described as the 8th wonder of the world, were destroyed, and the city was abandoned.

The Kyzikos people created an advanced civilization in architecture, science and art in the Hellenistic age and Roman rule periods. The main architectural remains that have survived from Kyzikos until today are the Temple of Hadrian, the Kyzikos Amphitheater, the Bluterion (meeting hall), the temple built in the name of Apoolonis, the Kirazlı Yayla Monastery and the Palata Fountain.

 

Dasykleion

The city is located on Hisartepe on the shore of Lake Manyas, near Ergili Village, 40 kilometers from Bandırma. The city, which is said to have been founded by the Lydian King Gyges (687-645), named after his father Daskylos, VII. It is understood that it has been inhabited since the middle of the century. Daskyleion is the most comprehensive, perhaps the only, Persian satrapy (governorship) center in our country, which is still being researched. From the Persians’ conquest of the Lydian Kingdom and then Western Anatolia in 546 BC; For more than two centuries, almost all Anatolia was ruled by the Persians, until Alexander the Great defeated the Persian army at Granikos in 334 BC.

The excavations carried out in Hisartepe showed that the settlement hosted Phrygian, Lydian, Persian, Helen and Byzantine civilizations. In the excavations in question, seal impressions called bulla, rock tombs, "8" shaped idols and stone axes are the main finds.

 

Prokonnesos

Prokonnesos (Marmara Island), located in the southwest of the Marmara Sea (Propontis), is the second largest island of Marmara after Gökçeada. The city, which is predicted to have started settlement after the Ionian migration in 1200 BC, has been attacked and plundered throughout history due to its strategic location in ancient times. For this reason, there are castle ruins from different periods at various points of the island.

Although there are no ruins of buildings that have survived until today, excavations revealed a castle ruin on the hill south of Viranköy and a khorasan walls in the harbor in Kesikçiler.

Marble, the island’s greatest natural wealth, has been the other element that has increased the attractiveness of the settlement from antiquity to the present day. From the Roman period to the present, the marble quarries have been operated here and the sarcophagi and architectural elements produced here have been in demand in Europe.